How to control what you see in the new Facebook news feed  

A few quick settings tweaks can ensure you see who you want

Facebook

Facebook announced recently that it’s changing the formula it uses to determine which stories appear in your news feed. While the full details are still murky, most people will see more posts from their friends and family, and fewer posts from big brands, celebrities, and businesses.

But what if you still want to keep up with the latest news from your favorite actor (or your favorite satellite internet company)? Simply Liking and Following them is no longer enough to ensure you’ll see everything. Now you also need to prioritize their posts.

Here’s how:

On a desktop computer

From your Facebook newsfeed, look for the three dots in the upper left hand corner. Click that, then click on Edit Preferences.

How to control what you see in the Facebook news feed

In the pop-up window, click on Prioritize who to see first.

How to control what you see in the Facebook news feed

You’ll see a list of all the pages and people you Like. Click on the ones whose posts you don’t want to miss, and a blue star will appear. Now you’ll always find them at the top of your news feed.

How to control what you see in the Facebook news feed

Click Done to save your choices.

 

On mobile phones

Look for the three lines or grid of dots symbol in the corner of the screen. Tap that, then scroll down to News Feed Preferences.

How to control what you see in the Facebook news feed

Tap this next. Now, select Prioritize who to see first.

How to control what you see in the Facebook news feed

Then choose which pages and people you want Facebook to prioritize for you.

How to control what you see in the Facebook news feed

Tap Done to save your picks.

That’s it. Now you’ll see your favorite people and brands at the top of your feed whenever you sign in.

Matt Farley
About Matt Farley 4 Articles
Matt Farley is a social media specialist with Viasat. A former pop culture journalist, he has covered subjects ranging from internet policy to punk rock music.